23
Feb 18

February Roundup: News, Events, Reviews

What an incredible month we have had at LSU Press! The Cemeteries of New Orleans by Peter B. Dedek was given an honorable mention in the Louisiana Literary Awards. Hood’s Texas Brigade by Susannah Ural, Civil War Logistics by Earl Hess, In the Wake of War by Andrew Lang, and The Army of the Potomac in the Overland and Petersburg Campaigns by Steven Sodergren were all selected as finalists for the 2017 Army Historical Foundation Distinguished Writing Awards. Karen Celestan and Cindy Ermus wrote fantastic posts for the LSU Press Blog. And we published new books by Leonard M. Moore, Eric Waters and Karen Celestan, Matthew Baker, Katy Simpson Smith, Claudia Emerson, Chanda Feldman, Joelle Biele, Gary Fincke, and Amy Meng.

Below you’ll find a list of our March titles, upcoming events with our authors, and some recent publicity and reviews of our books. If you want to keep up with the press in real time, follow us on TwitterInstagram, and Facebook!


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Selected Publicity and Praise

The Guerrilla Hunters: Irregular Conflicts During the Civil War edited by Brian D. McKnight and Barton A. Meyers:

“Brian D. McKnight and Barton A. Myers, in partnership with the Louisiana State University Press, have assembled a valuable set of essays on irregular warfare during the Civil War.” —John H. Matsui, The Civil War Monitor

A Horse With Holes In It by Greg A. Brownderville:

“The tone is conversational, the craft meticulous, and the subject matter eclectic, touching on everything from the Parthenon frieze to the Beebe blackbird deaths, Sweet Willie Wine to Walter Pater.” —Hope Coulter, The Arkansas Review

Maintaining Segregation: Children and Racial Instruction in the South, 1920-1955 by LeeAnn G. Reynolds:

“LeeAnn Reynolds expands our understanding of the complexity and insidious nature of segregation and, moreover, adds nuance and historiographical insight to the growing body of scholarship on children and youth during segregation through this comprehensive analysis.” —Jon N. Hale, Journal of the History of Childhood and Youth

 

The Army of the Potomac in the Overland and Petersburg Campaigns is a comprehensively researched, persuasively argued, and engagingly written study that advances significantly our understanding of this pivotal period in the Civil War.”  —The Civil War Book Review

New Directions in Slavery Studies: Commodification, Community, and Comparison edited by Jeff Forret and Christine E. Sears:

“Taken together, the pieces in New Directions in Slavery Studies. . . enrich the scholarship on American slavery by using case studies not only to provide links between various times and places but also to draw connections among themes that inform slavery studies. The threads weave together to reveal a pulsing, dynamic history of slaveries that will benefit educators, challenge scholars, and force all of us to question the present.”—Kelly Houston Jones, Journal of Southern History

Schooling in the Antebellum South: The Rise of Public and Private Education in Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama by Sarah L. Hyde:

“Hyde has written a book that is sure to challenge conventional thinking about public schools in the South.” —Allison Fredette, Journal of Southern History

Confederate Political Economy: Creating and Managing a Southern Corporatist Nation by Michael Bonner:

Confederate Political Economy is a well-researched and cogently argued book. . . .[it] has much to teach students of the Civil War era about the political culture and economic policies of a proslavery republic.” —Max Mishler, Journal of Southern History

Lt. Spalding in Civil War Louisiana: A Union Officer’s Humor, Privilege, and Ambition by Michael D. Pierson:

“Pierson’s discussion based on a relatively unknown soldier’s candid letter certainly broadens our understand of Civil War soldiers’ lives.” —Curtis D. Johnson,Journal of Southern History

In the Wake of War: Military Occupation, Emancipation, and Civil War America by Andrew Lang:

“In its examination of military occupation during the Civil War and Reconstruction, In the Wake of War powerfully underscores differences in contemporary white and black attitudes toward what the army’s role should be (and could be) in changing society.” —Civil War Books and Authors

 

“Carl Paulus’ richly rewarding book reminds that warfare, and those who engage in it, have always been in the eyes of beholders.” —The Civil War Book Review

02
Feb 18

January Roundup: News, Events, Reviews

January was another fantastic month here at LSU Press! We have lots of exciting news, and want to share it with you. On to Petersburg by Gordon C. Rhea was announced as a finalist for the 2018 Gilder Lehrman Lincoln Prize, and Reconstruction in Alabama by Michael W. Fitzgerald was chosen as a 2017 CHOICE Outstanding Academic Title. Joelle Biele and Jennifer Atkins wrote fantastic posts for the LSU Press Blog. We also published new books by Cindy Ermus and Sylvie Dubois, Emilie Gagnet Leumas, and Malcolm Richardson.

Below you’ll find a list of our February titles, upcoming events with our authors, and some recent publicity and reviews of our books.  If you want to keep up with the press in real time, follow us on  TwitterInstagram, and Facebook!


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Selected Publicity and Praise

Schooling in the Antebellum South: The Rise of Public and Private Education in Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama by Sarah L. Hyde

“This book should inspire further scholarship that connects this regional history on education with broader issues such as race and whiteness, gender, and slavery, specifically the tension between slaveholders and non-slaveholders over the establishment of state public school systems.”—Register of the Kentucky Historical Society

The Slaveholding Crisis: Fear of Insurrection and the Coming of the Civil War by Carl L. Paulus

“By exploring the interrelated politics of fear and exceptionalism, Paulus contributes to a broader shift in historians’ understanding of slavery, nationalism, and sectionalism in the nineteenth-century United States.”—Register of the Kentucky Historical Society

Hispanic and Latino New Orleans: Immigration and Identity since the Eighteenth Century by Andrew Sluyter, Case Watkins, James Chaney, and Annie Gibson

“Because of the impressive scholarship seen in Andrew Sluyter, Case Watkins, James Chaney, and Annie Gibson’s Hispanic and Latino New Orleans, a better spatial history of these oft-forgotten communities now exists.”—Historical Geography

Stepdaughters of History: Southern Women and the American Civil War by Catherine Clinton

“Clinton should be commended for going places many scholars avoid.”—Register of the Kentucky Historical Society 

The Army of the Potomac in the Overland and Petersburg Campaigns: Union Soldiers and Trench Warfare, 1864-1865 by Steven E. Sodergren:

“Steven E. Sodergren has produced a noteworthy book that uses a soldier-eye-view approach to describe the effect the last year of fighting had on the soldiers of the Army of the Potomac, and how they adapted to various changes.”—Civil War News

Legendary Louisiana Outlaws: The Villains and Heroes of Folk Justice by Keagan LeJeune:

“Those working on outlaws will find a resourceful study and an interesting gloss on contemporary intersections of legends, politics, and heritage.”—K. Brandon Barker, Journal of Folklore Research

The Atheist Wore Goat Silk: Poems by Anna Journey:

“Utilizing tactile poems that sweat on the page, from both a Texas and Mississippi past, The Atheist Wore Goat Silk acts as a prolonged fermata, where the speaker must reckon with her past and come to terms with it, although not gently.”—Alyse Bensel, The Pleiades Book Review

Reconstruction in Alabama: From Civil War to Redemption in the Cotton South by Michael Fitzgerald:

“Michael W. Fitzgerald’s new treatment of the story is an eye-opening reengagement with this period.”—Edwin C. Bridges, The Alabama Review

The Guerrilla Hunters: Irregular Conflicts during the Civil War edited by Brian D. McKnight and Barton A. Myers:

“What these scholars have done in this book is to take a fresh look at Civil War-era guerrilla warfare.”—Missouri Historical Review

In the Wake of War: Military Occupation, Emancipation, and Civil War America by Andrew F. Lang:

“The book argues that the Civil War era ushered in the long age of American wars of military occupation, and the work thus considers these occupations through the eyes of the occupier, revealing dynamic internal wars that were just as complex and consequential as those waged on the front lines.”—Andrew F. Lang in coversation on The Way of Improvement blog

05
Jan 18

December Roundup: News, Events, Reviews

December is always a special time of the year. Here’s some news from LSU Press last month. Visitations by Lee Upton was named one of Kirkus Reviews’ Best Indie Books of December. Books by Brannon Costello, Richard Campanella, and Kathryn Fontenot were included in holiday gift guides in the New Orleans Advocate and Forces of Geek. Philip Gould was awarded the 2016 James William Rivers Prize. Andrew F. Lang, Ed Falco, Michael Patrick Cullinane, and Bryan Giemza and Maria Hebert-Leiter wrote fantastic posts for the LSU Press Blog. And we published new books by Ed Falco, Michael Patrick Cullinane, Urmi Engineer Willoughby, Andrew F. Lang, April E. Holm, and James O. Heath.

Below you’ll find a list of our January titles, upcoming events with our authors, and some recent publicity and reviews of our books. If you want to keep up with the press in real time, follow us on TwitterInstagram, and Facebook!


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Selected Publicity and Praise

Girl after Girl after Girl: Poems by Nicole Cooley

“You probably know someone who needs a wrapped copy of this weirdly fascinating book for the holidays, perhaps with a tiny doll half-strangled amid the ribbons.”—Kenyon Review

Armies in Gray: The Organizational History of the Confederate States Army in the Civil War by Dan C. Fullerton

“This very well documented work is an immensely useful reference for anyone seriously interested in the Civil War”—NYMAS Review

The Secret Life of Bacon Tait a White Slave Trader Married to a Free Woman of Color by Hank Trent

The Secret Life of Bacon Tait opens a rare window into that dank and depressing world, and we are indebted to the author for the light he has shed on this dark corner of southern history. ”—Civil War Book Review

Promise: Poems by Sally Van Doren

“Sally Van Doren’s poetry is taut and honed, punctuated with tantalizing references to the senses and the sensual.”—Happening in the Hills

Reconstruction in Alabama: From Civil War to Redemption in the Cotton South by Michael W. Fitzgerald

“The book demonstrates a masterful synthesis of the era. Students of the Civil War Era will appreciate its admirable attention to detail and its judicious conclusions. It’s a book not to be missed. ”—Civil War Book Review

Images of Depression-Era Louisiana: the FSA Photographs of Ben Shahn, Russell Lee, and Marion Post Wolcott edited by Bryan Giemza and Maria Hebert-Leiter

Images of Depression-Era Louisiana offers a sweeping view of a Louisiana not so unlike our own, standing on the precipice of great changes, all the while fighting to keep its head above water and its traditions intact.”—Louisiana Cultural Vistas

The Guerrilla Hunters: Irregular Conflicts during the Civil War edited by Brian D. McKnight and Barton Myers

“an excellent collection”—Civil War Book Review

Devils Walking: Klan Murders along the Mississippi in the 1960s by Stanley Nelson

“Nelson and Phillips did not write for other historians, they wrote for the people of Forsyth County, Georgia and the Delta region of Mississippi and Louisiana. They wrote to hold a mirror up to their neighbors. They wrote for you and me. In doing so, they offer a lesson for historians on the purpose of writing history.”—Reviews in American History


30
Nov 17

November Roundup: News, Events, Reviews

November was quite a month here at LSU Press! Visitations by Lee Upton was a finalist in the short story category of the American Book Fest’s Best Book Awards. A poem from Ed Falco’s new book was featured on Poem-a-Day. Samuel C. Hyde wrote an article for the Washington Post. Brannon Costello, Lisa Hinrichsen, Gina Caison, and Stephanie Rountree, and Sally Van Doren wrote fantastic posts for the LSU Press Blog. And we published new books by Bryan Giemza and Maria Hebert-Leiter, Peter O’Connor, Lisa Hinrichsen, Gina Caison, and Stephanie Rountree, Susannah J. Ural, Kristen Brill, David R. Slavitt, and James Applewhite.

Below you’ll find a list of our December titles, upcoming events with our authors, and some recent publicity and reviews of our books. If you want to keep up with the press in real time, follow us on TwitterInstagram, and Facebook!

Need to buy a holiday gift for your favorite bookworm? Take 40% off* your entire order through December 15th.


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Selected Publicity and Praise

 Promise: Poems by Sally Van Doren

“St. Louisan Sally Van Doren’s third collection Promise features smart poems that bring a cheeky edge to the theme of domestic bliss. By-and-large tender poems of praise for familial love, they accomplish this celebration by telling the truth about it, dirty laundry included.”—Saint Louis Post-Dispatch

Voodoo and Power in New Orleans: The Politics of Religion in New Orleans, 1881-1940 by Kodi A. Roberts

“His careful study contributes to on-going scholarly efforts to better situate African diasporic religions within their immediate social settings and in the context of practitioners’ everyday struggles and desires.”—Nova Religio

Maintaining Segregation: Children and Racial Instruction in the South, 1920-1955 by LeeAnn G. Reynolds

“This ambitious study sheds light on how Jane and Jim Crow circumstances conditioned the South’s black and white younger inhabitants to manage racial inequality in the decades preceding the Civil Rights Movement. . . . The author displays an excellent familiarity with existing scholarly literature, and her arguments are cogent. . . . the narrative reads well, is engaging, and adds depth to the current understanding of a complex place and time.”—CHOICE

Civil War Logistics: A Study of Military Transportation by Earl J. Hess

“In Hess’s study one can find both a sound survey history of Civil War military transportation and a revealing quantitative analysis leading readers to the inescapable conclusion that the Union logistical network outperformed its foe’s in every possible way. Civil War Logistics is highly recommended.”—Civil War Books and Authors

Cityscapes of New Orleans by Richard Campanella

“Anyone with a library of books on New Orleans will want this one. And unlike some other reference books, Campanella’s is destined to be one that comes off the shelf over and over again.”—New Orleans Advocate

Remembering Reconstruction: Struggles Over the Meaning of America’s Most Turbulent Era edited by Carole Emberton and Bruce E. Baker

“Taken together, these deeply researched and cogently written essays comprise a kind of magic lantern that illuminates how many of today’s contentious social issues, like equality before the law, concepts of race, and rights of citizenship, were born during those tumultuous years.”—America’s Civil War

The Army of the Potomac in the Overland & Petersburg Campaigns by Steven E. Sodergren

“This is a solid, major contribution to our understanding of why men fought and how they were affected by and adapted to changing wartime conditions.”—NYMAS Review

The Secret Life of Bacon Tait a White Slave Trader Married to a Free Woman of Color by Hank Trent.

“Trent excels in re-creating the world of antebellum fortune-hunters like Tait. Lynchburg and the Richmond slave trade are diligently explored. A reader curious for more details as to how the trade worked (especially in terms of the operation of slave jails or “pens”) will find this small book an excellent resource. Trent makes it easy to imagine a grimy place of petty cruelties and vast injustices, where virtually every interaction possible within the boundaries of the peculiar institution might be found, all within a city block.”—Civil War News

Stepdaughters of History: Southern Women and the American Civil War by Catherine Clinton

“Clinton reminds us of the significant work that has been done as well as the significant work that remains to be done in original research, textbook publications, and college lectures. Those invited to give Fleming Lectures are known for their bold and original scholarship, and Catherine Clinton is no exception.”—Journal of Southern History

John Pendleton Kennedy: Early American Novelist, Whig Statesman, and Ardent Nationalist by Andrew R. Black

“Andrew R. Black has deftly taken the memory of a man who has lain dormant in Baltimore’s Green Mount Cemetery since 1870 and has breathed new life into Kennedy’s legacy as an important American literary and political figure.”—Journal of Southern History


27
Oct 17

October Roundup: News, Events, Reviews

We’ve been in high gear this October at LSU Press! The Fonville Winans Cookbook was named a Fall 2017 Okra Pick by the Southern Independent Booksellers Alliance. The Writer’s Almanac featured “Defiance” and “The Book of Usable Minutes” by Sally Van Doren as well as “Daughter” by Lisel Mueller. Poems by Kelly Cherry were read on KSFR’s Audio Saucepan. “Mad Money” by Nicole Cooley appeared on Poetry Daily. And Gambit published a short interview with Kathryn Fontenot. Cynthia Lejeune Nobles, Nicole Cooley, and Susannah J. Ural wrote fantastic posts for the LSU Press Blog. And we published new books by Richard Campanella, Brannon Costello, James L. Huston, Terry L. Jones, and Melinda Risch Winans and Cynthia Lejeune Nobles.

Below you’ll find a list of our November titles, upcoming events with our authors, and some selected publicity from October.  And if you want to keep up with LSU Press in real time, follow us on TwitterInstagram, and Facebook.


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We will be at the Louisiana Book Festival tomorrow! Come say hello, attend special panels featuring our authors, and buy some books for your favorite bibliophile. In fact, take 30% off and free shipping* on select Louisiana titles until the end of the month!

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Selected Publicity and Praise

The Humility of the Brutes by Ron Smith

“As a whole, Ron Smith’s “The Humility of the Brutes” is a deft and elegant figuration of the creative mind’s energetic confrontation with the eternal motion of time. Smith’s courageous poems document his tireless interaction with the endless events, places, and moments that make up human history. These are graceful, timeless poems of destiny and rebellion.”—The Journal

Visitations by Lee Upton

 “In Visitations, everyone is haunted by some version of his or her most monstrous self, but this haunting isn’t necessarily bad. Visitations suggests that monstrousness is the purest form of honesty, the bravest kind of intimacy. In a world in which we are all staving off loneliness, maybe admitting our worst impulses isthe best way to begin saving ourselves.”—Fiction Writers Review

Stepdaughters of History: Southern Women and the American Civil War by Catherine Clinton:

“These essays are extraordinarily well written. While theoretically and historiographically sophisticated, they are accessible to a general audience and also worthwhile for readers more familiar with the material.”—Southwestern Historical Quarterly

The Fonville Winans Cookbook: Recipes and Photographs from a Louisiana Artist by Melinda Risch Winans and Cynthia Lejeune Nobles

The Fonville Winans Cookbook: Recipes and Photographs from a Louisiana Artist will appeal to cooks, those who enjoy reading biographies and those interested in photography.”—The Advocate

On to Petersburg: Grant and Lee, June 4-15, 1864 by Gordon Rhea:

“Gordon Rhea’s Overland Campaign series has rightfully earned the praise of professional historians and Civil War enthusiasts alike. It is by far the fullest military treatment of the brutal six-week showdown in Virginia between Union and Confederate heavyweights U.S. Grant and Robert E. Lee during spring 1864. . . .  In On to Petersburg, Gordon Rhea’s research and battle narrative skills are as impressive in their display as they’ve ever been. . . . In every way, On to Petersburg has been well worth the long wait and is a fitting end to a series destined to become an all-time classic.”—Civil War Books and Authors 

 Power and Corruption in the Early Modern Portuguese World by Erik Lars Myrup

“A worthwhile book overall, both for the stories it tells and the questions it provokes. Myrup’s archival work is admirable, stretching from Goiania to Macau by way of metropolitan capitals, and his dominance of both European languages and Chinese strengthens his conclusions.”—The Americas

Extreme Civil War: Guerrilla Warfare, Environment, and Race on the Trans-Mississippi Frontier by Matthew M. Stith

“Among other accomplishments, Stith’s analysis of total war on the trans-Mississippi frontier does much to expand the geography of the Civil War, especially insofar as it incorporates divisions among Native Americans within Indian Territory.”—Reviews in American History

The Confederate Homefront: A History in Documents by Wallace Hettle

“English historian G. M. Trevelyan wrote: ‘Every true history must force us to remember that the past was once as real as the present and as uncertain as the future.’ Nothing does this better than the actual words written by the people who were there. Anthologies like The Confederate Homefront allow us to hear the voices of the past whispering in our ear.”—Civil War Times

Marc-Antoine Caillot and the Company of the Indies in Louisiana: Trade in the French Atlantic World  by Erin M. Greenwald

“In this welcome addition to the historiography of the early modern Atlantic world, Erin Greenwald sheds new light upon a crucial, though under-studied, period in the history of French colonial Louisiana. . .”—Journal of Historical Geography


02
Oct 17

September Roundup: News, Events, Reviews

September was quite a month here at LSU Press! Blood Work: Imagining Race in American Literature, 1890—1940 by Shawn Salvant won 2016 C. Hugh Holman Award; Galaxie Wagon: Poems by Darnell Arnoult won the Thomas and Lillie D. Chaffin Award for Appalachian Writing; and Slim Harpo: Blues King Bee of Baton Rouge won both a Certificate of Merit from the Association of Recorded Sound Collections Awards and the 2017 Blues Book of the Year from Living Blues magazine. Lee Upton, Kathryn Fontenot and Trent Brown wrote fantastic posts for the LSU Press Blog. And we published new books by Jennifer Atkins, Trent Brown, Nicole Cooley, Kathryn Fontenot, Earl J. Hess, and Gordon C. Rhea.

Below you’ll find a list of our October titles, upcoming events with our authors, and some selected publicity from September. And if you want to keep up with LSU Press in real time, follow us on TwitterInstagram, and Facebook.


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Selected Publicity and Praise

Blackout Starlight: New and Selected Poems, 1997-2015 by Bruce Bond

Blackout Starlight is a milestone release. . . One can certainly read Bond for the sheer delight of beholding a thing well done. Fellow poets, however, will benefit from a deep consideration of his ambition, vision, and delivery.”—Colorado Review

Girl after Girl after Girl: Poems by Nicole Cooley

“. . . this collection, her fifth, is attempting something special in its unconditional study of mothers, daughters, and sisters—of all ages. That she employs time travel in her poems is impossible to explain, so we’ll just enjoy the experience.”—Foreword Reviews

The Cemeteries of New Orleans: A Cultural History by Peter B. Dedek

“Four stars. . . . An excellent primer on some of our city’s most important cultural treasures.”—New Orleans Magazine

Black Labor, White Sugar: Caribbean Braceros and Their Struggle for Power in the Cuban Sugar Industry by Philip A. Howard

Howard makes some of the strongest arguments for the development of a black class consciousness that crossed ethnic lines.”—World Sugar History Newsletter

Schooling in the Antebellum South: The Rise of Public and Private Education in Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama by Sarah L. Hyde

“. . . Sarah Hyde treats us to a long-due examination of white education in the antebellum South.”—The Journal of the History of Childhood and Youth

The Language of Vision: Photography and Southern Literature in the 1930s and After by Joseph R. Millichap

“His purposes in this slim volume are synthetic and, in the best sense of the word, provocative: to bring together two rich artistic and critical traditions in ways that demonstrate the mutually enlivening creative interplay at work, and that inspire further investigation.”—Modernism/Modernity

William & Mary commissioned a poem from Brenda Marie Osbey. You can watch her performance here:

Damn Yankees! Demonization and Defiance during the American Civil War by George C. Rable

“Award-winning Professor Emeritus George C. Rable has once again added to the historiography of the Civil War with his outstanding Damn Yankees! Demonization and Defiance during the American Civil War. . .”—H-War

On to Petersburg: Grant and Lee, June 4-15, 1864 by Gordon C. Rhea

“Unparalleled. . . .”—New York Journal of Books

From Nothing: Poems by Anya Krugovoy Silver

“In these poems, bracing honesty coincides with the quiet transformations of language. Especially moving are the expressions of praise that take shape in the absence of consolation.”—The Cresset Journal

The Richmond Times-Dispatch published an article on Ron Smith’s poetry.

Extreme Civil War: Guerrilla Warfare, Environment, and Race on the Trans-Mississippi Frontier by Matthew M. Stith

“Stith has researched his subject well and produced an engaging and well-balanced book. It deserves the attention of all Civil War historians.”—Kansas History


16
Aug 12

H-France review of Murder in the Metro

“…an engaging study which draws the reader in with the murder mystery, while making an important argument about the perils of French politics in the 1930s.”

Read the full review [PDF]


02
Nov 09

Betty Adcock reviewed and interviewed

9780807133095Betty Adcock's most recent collection of poetry, Slantwise, was recently reviewed by the online journal Cerise Press.  Ms. Adcock also gave a wonderful interview in which she discusses her craft.  You may read both by following the links below.

Wandering in Earth: Slantwise by Betty Adcock (Cerise Press)

Poetry is a Way of Seeing: A Conversation with Betty Adcock (Cerise Press)


13
Oct 09

We Were Merchants reviewed in WSJ

9780807134498Hans Sternberg's new book, We Were Merchants, recently received an excellent review in the Wall Street Journal.  Read the review by clicking the link below.

Hospitality Department (Wall Street Journal)


08
Oct 09

Styron’s Letters to My Father reviewed

9780807134009 William Styron's Letters to My Father has recently been reviewed in the Washington Post.

Click here to read the reivew.