17
Apr 15

Around the Press in 80 Books: We Just Keep Running the Line

In celebration of LSUP’s 80th anniversary the staff selected 80 of our most memorable titles. Adding to our “Around the Press in 80 Books” blog series, Managing Editor Lee Sioles writes about We Just Keep Running the Line: Black Southern Women and the Poultry Processing Industry.

GrayLINE_jktfront(HR)The poultry processing industry in El Dorado, Arkansas, was the largest employer in the region in the latter half of the twentieth century. We Just Keep Running the Line is the story of the labor force—composed primarily of black women—upon which this powerful industry relied.

Men took the better jobs in the area, driving women into more dangerous and labor-intensive work like poultry processing. Author LaGuana Gray details the disgusting and demeaning conditions for those doing line work in the plants—the inhuman pace, extreme temperatures, and physical dangers—and the callousness of company supervisors, whose control over their mostly black, mostly female workforce was absolute. Using collected oral histories, Gray explores the physical and psychological toll this work took on black women, and analyzes their survival strategies and their fight to retain their humanity and care for their families.

I admire this book for its intelligent, dispassionate writing and thorough research—but I’m also moved by its origins in something highly personal: The author’s mother was a poultry processing worker in Arkansas. Gray tells us that her mother was “noncommittal” about her job, saying “chickens will feed and clothe you.” But she washed her clothes separately from those of the rest of the family and endured “chicken rashes” and boils from repeated exposure to toxins. Many workers quit the chicken plants within a few days, but Gray’s mother worked there for 23 years.  She didn’t complain—but refused to let her daughters take summer jobs at the plants, saying “You don’t need to work there.”  Instead, LaGuana Gray­ grew up to be a scholar and to write what has been called “a jewel of a labor history” and “one of the most significant works to appear on the lives of the nearly invisible world of poultry workers of South Arkansas.”

We Just Keep Running the Line received a “highly recommended” review in the April 2015 issue of CHOICE.

Buy this book now for 20% off and get free shipping on all orders over $50, use code 0480FAV at checkout. 


15
Apr 15

Around the Press in 80 Books: French, Cajun, Creole, Houma

In celebration of LSUP’s 80th anniversary the staff selected 80 of our most memorable titles. Adding to our “Around the Press in 80 Books” blog series, Financial Operations Manager Rebekah Brown writes about French, Cajun, Creole, Houma.

BrasseauxFRENCH_jktfront (2)When your grandparents’ names are Pierre and Datille and you were born in southern Louisiana, there’s a good chance you have French-speaking relatives in your family. Such is the case for me. I grew up thinking everyone had a grandmother who easily spoke Cajun French and English in the same sentence. As it happens, my grandmother, who hails from the small Louisiana town of Basile, didn’t speak a word of English until her second-born son went to elementary school and enthusiastically shared with her what he’d learned.

French, Cajun, Creole, Houma: A Primer on Francophone Louisiana, by Carl A. Brasseaux, is an entertaining history of how the diverse French-speaking people in Louisiana created the unique, vibrant culture that intrigues people around the globe. In this study, Brasseaux presents an overview of all the various Francophone communities. I knew only of my family’s dialect, not realizing that throughout the French-speaking regions of Louisiana there are many other variants. This book, and others like it published by LSU Press, make me immensely thankful that Louisiana has a publishing house that preserves the history of our culture with accuracy, eloquence, and beauty—words, by the way, that I would use to describe my grandmother’s language.

Buy this book now for 20% off and get free shipping on all orders over $50, use code 0480FAV at checkout. 


13
Apr 15

Around the Press in 80 Books: New Orleans: The Underground Guide

In celebration of LSUP’s 80th anniversary the staff selected 80 of our most memorable titles. Adding to our “Around the Press in 80 Books” blog series, Designer Barbara Bourgoyne writes about New Orleans: The Underground Guide.

WelchNEW_sketch.inddNew Orleans—the Big Easy, the Crescent City, the Birthplace of Jazz, or whatever nickname you choose to call it—is a city unlike any other. It draws in upwards of 9 million tourists a year to its famed streets looking to pass a good time. Many of whom head straight to the French Quarter to eat and drink the day—and night— away. Countless trips to New Orleans later, and I’m happy, albeit sad, to admit I was one of them.

I’ve lived an hour away from New Orleans my entire life, and yet somehow I always managed to get stuck. Stuck in the New Orleans that was filled with throngs of people and tourist traps. And honestly, that’s just not as much fun as it sounds. I longed for more. I longed to see the places that the locals actually go. I knew they existed, but I was in desperate need of guidance.

In the spring of 2013, I found that guidance while visiting Tulane University’s bookstore with an old friend. We happened upon New Orleans: The Underground Guide. We didn’t think twice. We had to have it. I wasn’t completely thrilled with the way it looked, being a designer and all, but it contained a wealth of information. Quirky neighborhoods, family friendly events, music venues of every kind, some delightfully sketchy locales, and, of course, out-of-this-world cuisine—this book contained them all.

Fast forward a few months, and I was thrilled to find that very same book on our spring list. The task of redesigning and updating (every two years) now ours—or mine as it turned out.

I couldn’t be more excited to have a hand in making this information available to all of those people wanting to step away from the lure of Bourbon Street, those hoping to find an out-of-the-way gem, and those longing to experience the real New Orleans and everything it has to offer.

Buy this book now for 20% off and get free shipping on all orders over $50, use code 0480FAV at checkout. 


10
Apr 15

Around the Press in 80 Books: Abbott Awaits

In celebration of LSUP’s 80th anniversary the staff selected 80 of our most memorable titles. Adding to our “Around the Press in 80 Books” blog series, Digital Initiatives and Database Manager Bobby Keane writes about Abbott Awaits.

BachelderABBOTT_covfrontHR

Usually I read fiction as a means of escape, but when I read Abbott Awaits it was like reading a journal of my own thoughts and experiences, grafted onto a fictional character.

Abbott is a modern husband and father. He has a 2-year-old daughter and his wife is pregnant with their second child. Over the course of 90 or so short vignettes, we follow Abbott as he navigates and muses about his role as a parent and as a partner in a marriage that has been inevitably changed as a result of parenthood. When I was reading this book I, too, had a 2-year-old son, Joseph, and my wife was pregnant with our second child. So, I can attest to the pitch-perfect realism of Abbott’s thought processes and his dialogue with his wife and toddler. There are several instances when I would read a passage and think to myself, “Yes! He gets it! Was Chris Bachelder eavesdropping on my conversation with Joseph this morning?” Through Abbott, Chris Bachelder has perfectly articulated what goes through the mind of a man who wants to be a good father and husband but has doubts that he is succeeding. This quote from the back of the book sums it up nicely:

Abbott’s pensive self-doubt comes to a head one day in late June as he cleans vomited raspberries out of his daughter’s car seat and realizes: “The following propositions are both true: (A) Abbott would not, given the opportunity, change one significant thing about his life, but (B) Abbott cannot stand his life.”

While Abbott Awaits is written from a male standpoint, there are numerous observations, sometimes scary and sometimes funny, about parenthood that will ring true to both men and women. For example, at one point, after his daughter appears to be taking an unusually long nap, Abbott finds himself afraid to go into his daughter’s bedroom to check on her for fear that she might not be breathing. Every new parent is assaulted by worries like this that are often unfounded and unreasonable.

Another example: Abbott is playing with his daughter and he has an idea to teach her how to do a somersault. He gently flips her over on her head and then into a roll to demonstrate. She is pleased and now wants her father to do one. Abbott, wanting to be a fun dad, agrees. However, he hasn’t done a somersault in ages and suddenly isn’t sure that he really remembers how to do one. He manages to do a poor approximation of a somersault and injures himself in the process only to find that, his daughter, whom this display was for, had shifted her attention and had not watched him.

A man does not always know his ultimate acts—the last time he swims in the ocean, the last time he makes love. But at the age of thirty-seven, perhaps the mid-point of his one and only life, Abbott knows that he has attempted his final somersault.

For me, five years later, both of my children have grown out of their toddler phases and I have become fully confident in my ability as a parent. However, I still enjoy opening Abbott Awaits to a random page and smiling as I read and remember that time in my life. Smiling, not only because of Chris Bachelder’s brilliant and witty prose but, more importantly, because my wife and I successfully made it through those uncertain years and things have turned out better than we could have imagined.

Buy this book now for 20% off and get free shipping on all orders over $50, use code 0480FAV at checkout.


08
Apr 15

Around the Press in 80 Books: Clementine Hunter

In celebration of LSUP’s 80th anniversary the staff selected 80 of our most memorable titles. Adding to our “Around the Press in 80 Books” blog series, Marketing Manager Erin Rolfs writes about Clementine Hunter, by Art Shriver and Tom Whitehead.

Clementine Hunter

The paintings of Louisiana artist Clementine Hunter crept into my consciousness slowly. I was not aware of her work when I moved to Baton Rouge in 2000, and I didn’t become fully acquainted with Hunter’s oeuvre until LSU Press published the eponymous book written by Thomas Whitehead and Art Shiver in 2012. But looking back over the past decade of living here I can see how I was always surrounded by her art; I just didn’t notice it and didn’t have the knowledge required to appreciate it.

Prior to the publication of Clementine Hunter: Her Life and Art, I took several trips to Melrose Plantation, where Hunter spent most of her life working in cotton fields and later as a housemaid, and where she painted the famed African House Murals. I also walked through exhibits of her work at Louisiana State Museum and the Ogden Museum multiple times. I was aware of the FBI investigation into Hunter forgeries, and even recognized that a person in possession of a real Hunter painting had something special. Yet none of this managed to impress upon me the true value of her work. I placed the public’s interest in these seemingly unsophisticated vignettes in the same category as liking the taste of boudin or the sound of Zydeco music—it was just an ornament of a culture I didn’t grow up in and therefore had little reason to contemplate further.*

But during the course of planning and executing the marketing for Clementine Hunter I noticed that her paintings, which seemed at first like quaint, rural outsider art that failed to appeal to my own aesthetic, had transformed themselves into remarkable windows into the life of an African American woman working on a plantation and living in the heart of Louisiana. I realized, on a personal level, I had dismissed her work because it seemed simple and evoked themes I didn’t relate to. It turned out that this simplicity and distance were exactly why they deserved my attention.

What records do we have that call up the vivid memories of a black servant living in central Louisiana during the twentieth century? How many first-hand accounts of female plantation workers do we have from any state, from any time? How many documents grant us access to the inner life of any marginalized person? And when do we ever get to explore that perspective without it being colored by the overbearing shadow of those with more power? The answers to all those questions is very few and very rarely.

After hours of art history courses in college it took a 260-page book to bring this to my attention. Regardless of whether the work matches your couch or reinforces your cultural identity, Clementine Hunter’s art is an invitation to see the world as she did. This exercise, only possible through the medium of visual art, is one all of us should undertake if we want to speak more honestly about our shared history.

It is when LSU Press publishes work like this, the kind that disturbs the self-curated hierarchy of what matters, that I am not only humbled as a person but also as an employee.

*I’ve also come to love boudin and I will boogie down to Zydeco.

Buy this book now for 20% off and get free shipping on all orders over $50. Use code 0480FAV at checkout.


06
Apr 15

Around the Press in 80 Books: Treasures of LSU

In celebration of LSUP’s 80th anniversary the staff selected 80 of our most memorable titles. Adding to our “Around the Press in 80 Books” blog series, Senior Editor Catherine Kadair writes about Treasures of LSU.

One of my favorite books the Press has published is Treasures of LSU. Working at LSU most of my adult life, after going there as an undergraduate, I had my own ideas about the university’s “treasures,” broadly speaking—its massive live oaks, the Depression-era murals in the English building, the prehistoric Indian mounds, and the design of the original core campus, to name just a few. When I first heard about the book, I was curious whether my own ideas of campus jewels would make the short list or if the special things and places chosen for inclusion would come from unexpected areas. A word of background: The book was put together in honor of LSU’s 150th anniversary, and everyone in the LSU community—faculty, staff, and students—was invited to submit nominations. In what must have been a tough process, the anniversary committee selected 101 entities to include in this book—some of which were well-known and expected entries, and others that no one on the committee had thought about or at times were even aware of. Experts were then asked to contribute articles or stories about each treasure. Volume editor Laura F. Lindsay, who spent more than thirty years on LSU’s campus as a teacher and administrator, did an amazing job organizing the book according to type of treasure (natural spaces, buildings, cultural artifacts, research collections, etc.) and obtaining glorious full-color illustrations of each one.

What I found as I copyedited the book was that, yes, my candidates for LSU treasures were all in there; in addition, there were numerous other jewels in LSU’s crown that I was totally ignorant of. Who knew that Huey P. Long’s well-thumbed, heavily marked personal Bible is housed in LSU Libraries’ Special Collections? That the university has the largest collection of Newcomb pottery anywhere? That researchers from around the world come to LSU to study its renowned collection of bird specimens? That LSU owns a rustic camp of 1,300 acres in the Rocky Mountains where it’s been teaching geology since 1928? These and other fascinating glimpses of LSU’s rich history and culture can all be found in Treasures of LSU.

Buy this book now for 20% off and get free shipping on all orders over $50. Use code 0480FAV at checkout.


01
Apr 15

Around the Press in 80 Books: Murder in the Metro

In celebration of LSUP’s 80th anniversary the staff selected 80 of our most memorable titles. Adding to our “Around the Press in 80 Books” blog series, Senior Editor Alisa Plant writes about Murder in the Métro.

BrunelleMURDER_covfrontHROn the evening of May 16, 1937, the train doors opened at the Porte Dorée station in the Paris Métro to reveal a dying woman slumped on the floor, an eight-inch stiletto buried in her neck. She was alone in the car. No one witnessed the crime, and the killer left behind little forensic evidence. Police identified the dead woman as twenty-nine-year-old Laetitia Toureaux, an Italian immigrant with ties to a right-wing terrorist organization, the Cagoule. This sensational crime—the first murder in the Paris Métro system—captivated the imagination of the French public for weeks, but Toureaux’s killer was never found.

Sixty years later, in 1997, historians Gayle Brunelle and Annette Finley-Croswhite came across a fleeting reference to Toureaux’s murder. Intrigued, they decided to do some digging in French archives to see what they could learn about her life and shocking death—only to be met with resistance at every turn. Inventories of documents revealed that files about Toureaux did exist, but normally helpful archivists claimed they had no knowledge of any such records, or demanded that Brunelle and Finley-Croswhite obtain special permissions from the French Ministry of Culture in order to view them. But while Laetitia Toureaux and the Cagoule cast a longer and darker shadow than Brunelle and Finley-Croswhite had initially realized, these obstacles only increased their determination. Tenacious researchers, they at last succeeded in gaining access to the huge police file about Toureaux, her political activities, and the investigation into her death. They began writing her story. And they posted a preliminary article about their findings online, which is where I came in.

As the acquiring editor for European history here at the Press, I seek out top-flight scholarship for our list. Reading about Toureaux, I quickly became transfixed by Brunelle and Finley-Croswhite’s work. I contacted them in the hope that their manuscript wasn’t under contract elsewhere—and it was not. Long story short, about a year later Murder in the Métro was published under the LSU Press imprint. Brunelle and Finley-Croswhite believe they’ve solved the mystery of who killed Laetitia Toureaux. But if you want to know who did it, you’ll have to read the book.

Buy this book now for 20% off and get free shipping on all orders over $50, use code 0480FAV at checkout. 


30
Mar 15

Around the Press in 80 Books: Views from the Dark Side of American History

In celebration of LSUP’s 80th anniversary the staff selected 80 of our most memorable titles. Adding to our “Around the Press in 80 Books” blog series, Editor Neal Novak writes about Views from the Dark Side of American History.

FellmanVIEWS_covfrontGraduate school, as anyone who attended can attest, can be an overwhelming experience. I had little idea of the challenges I would face when I stepped into my first history graduate seminar in the fall of 2002. Little did I know a decade later I would copyedit a book that would have served as a wonderful guide to navigate me through grad school.

Michael Fellman’s Views from the Dark Side of American History is as much about how one becomes a historian as it about how one is a historian. In this sense, Dark Side is undoubtedly the most intimate work Fellman published over his long, illustrious career. He shares stories about colleagues with whom he disagreed, and he readily admits his own limitations as a researcher, instructor, and friend. Humility, it seems, served as a counterbalance to Fellman’s brilliance.

Even so, it is all but impossible not to be impressed by the works Fellman authored and revisits in this volume. His book Inside War, which he reflects upon in the final chapter of Dark Side, is a seminal work that, like the author himself, is inspired, passionate, and unapologetic. Equally remarkable is the way in which Fellman outlines his approach to history, research, applied theory, and analysis. The result is a study that examines methodology—indeed few were as fearless as Fellman when engaging the historiography—and is deeply personal. Historians who are true to themselves, he suggests, write history that is true to the people, places, and events they study. Graduate school may be ten years behind me now, but I’d like to think that Fellman—who passed away just seven months after publication of Dark Side—shared with me a few lessons that apply to life outside the classroom as well.

Buy this book now for 20% off and get free shipping on all orders over $50, use code 0480FAV at checkout. 


27
Mar 15

Around the Press in 80 Books: Best of LSU Fiction

In celebration of LSUP’s 80th anniversary the staff selected 80 of our most memorable titles. Adding to our “Around the Press in 80 Books” blog series, Associate Director of Development Tori Gill writes about Best of LSU Fiction.

AlexiusBESTFICTION_JktfrontHRThere are two components of Nolde Alexius and Judy Kahn’s, Best of LSU Fiction that drew me in: its collaborative origin and its symbol of LSU’s strong literary presence.  As a relative “newbie” to the world of LSU literature I have found that Nolde and Judy did a fantastic job of revealing to me the treasure of this region’s fictional writing.

Serving in a development role, I find the long list of names acknowledged in the back of the book astounding!  Over seventy people gave generously to support this endeavor.  What an incredible statement and affirmation of Nolde and Judy’s discovery.  LSU’s literary legacy is appreciated far beyond campus lines it is revered by so many.

The twenty authors that are included in the publication collectively, old and new, symbolize LSU’s vast array of talented writers.  I have to admit when I first picked up the book I recognized some authors but not many.  After reading through there is no doubt why the pieces were chosen.  Warren’s depiction of life on a small Tennessee farm, and Bradley’s description of Baton Rouge landmarks make words on paper seem real and relatable.

Thank you to Nolde and Judy for their hard work and commitment in creating a tangible piece of LSU literary history.  Whether you read this book to enjoy pieces of literature you already know as masterful, or in my case as an introduction, you will close the book with the same lasting impression: “wow.”

Buy this book now for 20% off and get free shipping on all orders over $50, use code 0480FAV at checkout. 


25
Mar 15

Around the Press in 80 Books: Origins of the New South, 1877-1913

In celebration of LSUP’s 80th anniversary the staff selected 80 of our most memorable titles. Adding to our “Around the Press in 80 Books” blog series, Executive Editor Rand Dotson writes about Origins of the New South, 1877-1913.

Origins of the New SouthAt some point in his or her academic career, every southern historian encounters C. Vann Woodward’s Origins of the New South, 1877-1913. It stands sixty-four years after its publication as one of the cornerstones of southern historiography; a book that all scholarship on the modern south addresses in some fashion or another. They all read it, and if they are like me, they leave its 654 pages a little awed by the breadth of Woodward’s accomplishments, not the least of which is his recasting the post-war South as a place that few historians before him would have recognized. It is a book that today is so iconic and influential that no one even feels the need to use its full title, they just call it Origins.

Published in 1951 as volume 9 in LSU Press’s “A History of the South” series, Origins of the New South won the prestigious Bancroft Prize from Columbia University the following year. Reviewers hailed it as one of the finest books on American history that would be published in the twentieth century as well as a work that would force historians to rewrite much of the South’s history, praise that in both cases turned out to be entirely true. In it, Woodward rightfully and trenchantly assails the very notion of a New South, casting the transformations of the period not as progress, but as one of the ultimate swindles in U.S. history. He destroys myths that long needed destroying, and he does so with the sort of verve and wit that makes the book seem ageless. At LSU Press, we consider Origins among the most treasured jewels of our long backlist; a title that is emblematic of why university publishing matters.

Buy this book now for 20% off and get free shipping on all orders over $50, use code 0480FAV at checkout. 


23
Mar 15

Around the Press in 80 Books: A Confederacy of Dunces

In celebration of LSUP’s 80th anniversary the staff selected 80 of our most memorable titles. Adding to our “Around the Press in 80 Books” blog series, Assistant to the Director Erica Bossier writes about A Confederacy of Dunces.

TooleDUNCES35th_jktfrontI don’t think a week goes by without some type of rights inquiry for A Confederacy of Dunces.  It is amazing how many “bests” lists of 20th century novels this title is on every year and how beloved the characters are all over the world.  It has been translated into over 27 languages and when our copies of the translations are delivered, it is fascinating to see the interpretation of the cover art from other cultures.  The book has never been out of print since its initial publication in 1980.  When I visit New Orleans I see so many things that remind me of reading this novel and it makes me smile and appreciate the book and the city even more.

To work for LSU Press, the publisher of this iconic comic novel , and to look through the files and see the story of how this book was published, and to work with our agents on subsidiary rights for this title is something I will always remember from my time at LSU Press.  We’re all looking forward to the stage version in November!

Buy this book now for 20% off and get free shipping on all orders over $50, use code 0480FAV at checkout. 


20
Mar 15

Around the Press in 80 Books: The Complete Works of Kate Chopin

In celebration of LSUP’s 80th anniversary the staff selected 80 of our most memorable titles. Adding to our “Around the Press in 80 Books” blog series, Director MaryKatherine Callaway writes about The Complete Works of Kate Chopin.

Academic 0807131512publishers often focus their lists on new scholarship in various fields, bringing into print contributions that offer fresh research, assert a different argument, or ground those findings within a broader context.

Occasionally, however, we also have the opportunity to issue a book containing older work, important writing by authors who for various reasons have dropped out of print and off the syllabus.

One such book is THE COMPLETE WORKS OF KATE CHOPIN, edited by the late Per Seyersted, a professor at the University of Oslo. He succeeded in gathering together all of Chopin’s previously unpublished and published works. Kate Chopin, born in 1850, often used Louisiana as the setting for her work, and she wrote prolifically—some would say frantically—to support herself and her six children after the untimely death of her husband.

First published by LSU Press in the Fall of 1969 in two hardcover volumes with a foreword by the renowned literary critic Edmund Wilson, these 1024 pages contain all of Chopin’s writing: 96 short stories, 20 poems, several essays, and two novels, some in print for the first time.

Seyersted added an appendix with a wealth of invaluable information, including the publication dates, where the works were published, and notes on the changes Chopin made at various stages.

Publication of this edition played a large part in reigniting interest in Chopin’s writing, and today she is one of a handful of nineteenth century American women writers taught and read worldwide.

The Press later combined the two volumes into one hardcover volume, published a paperback edition in 2006, and an ebook in 2012.

We are proud to think of the many thousands of scholars, students, and general readers who have enjoyed Kate Chopin’s writing because they opened this book.

Buy this book now for 20% off and get free shipping on all orders over $50, use code 0480FAV at checkout. 


18
Mar 15

Around the Press in 80 Books: Talking About Movies with Jesus

In celebration of LSUP’s 80th anniversary the staff selected 80 of our most memorable titles. Adding to our “Around the Press in 80 Books” blog series, Associate Financial Operations Manager Leslie Green writes about LSUP and The Southern Review poet David Kirby and his collection, Talking About Movies with Jesus

One of the thKirbyTALKING_jktfrontHRings about working at LSU Press is not only do we get to work with some of the most brilliant writers but, it turns out, they are all really nice, delightful people. Publishing is akin to a theater production in that there are many people behind the scenes making it all turn into magic. And our writers understand that, especially, David Kirby. He respects the important contributions made by our editorial, design and production, and marketing staff.

David Kirby’s poetry is great in manuscript form, but have you seen the cover art for Talking about Movies with Jesus? It is quintessential David Kirby, all full of cultural references and jokes. Sometimes our writers have art they very much want featured on the covers of their books and that is helpful. But in this case, our designer, Michelle Neustrom, made the image for David. He loved it. And David is symptomatic of all our writers, not only are they passionate about their work, they also understand that the people here at LSU Press truly care about their books.

David has published five collections with LSU Press. To quote Amy Gerstler, “these poems loop and maneuver through the weighty and hilarious with an unerring sense of proportion, studded with delicious tidbits of music, religion, history, wit.” This particular collection is my favorite, so far, from a poet who is prolific, thank goodness.

Buy this book now for 20% off and get free shipping on all orders over $50, use code 0480FAV at checkout. 


16
Mar 15

Around the Press in 80 Books: Mike the Tiger

In celebration of LSUP’s 80th anniversary the staff selected 80 of our most memorable titles. Kicking off our “Around the Press in 80 Books” blog series, Financial Operations Manager Becky Brown writes about our University’s beloved mascot. 

BakerMIKE(2nd)_covfrontWhen you grow up in Baton Rouge, it’s just a given that you’ve visited Mike the Tiger on the LSU campus at least once in your life—probably multiple times.  It’s a tradition I’ve carried on with my children and hope to do with grandchildren someday.  Working on the LSU campus in the shadow of Tiger Stadium gives me the opportunity to visit Mike often, and I get a wonderful feeling of pride and satisfaction every time, knowing the long history and tradition of having a live Bengal tiger on our campus.  You never meet a stranger when you’re visiting Mike; he’s a conversation-starter for sure!  I’ve talked to numerous people who are passing through Baton Rouge just to visit Mike the Tiger.  And I love being able to share some of the stories, history, and legends of the six tigers who have been beloved Mikes.

Many of the stories in Mike the Tiger: The Roar of LSU are ones I remember from growing up in Baton Rouge and attending LSU. I enjoy flipping through the pages, absorbing the history, seeing the photos, re-living the memories.  Mike holds a special place in my heart and I know I’m not alone.  I’m so glad LSU Press published this book so that future generations know the reasons behind the long-standing traditions, and why Mike is so important to LSU.  It’s one of my absolute favorites and I’m proud to recommend it to anyone—particularly anyone who’s ever said, “meet me at the tiger cage”!

Buy this book now for 20% off and get free shipping on all orders over $50, use code 0480FAV at checkout. 


01
Apr 15

The Southern Review Celebrates Its 80th Anniversary at the Strand!

Readings by Stephen Dunn, David Wojahn, Jayne Anne Philips and more
Strand Bookstore, 828 Broadway, New York, NY, on 1 May 2015, 7:00 PM

The Southern Review celebrates 80 years of publishing the best of fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction by established and emerging writers. A stellar line-up of The Southern Review’s poets and novelists joins the journal’s editors to mark this anniversary milestone on May 1st at 7 PM at the third-floor Rare Book Room of the Strand Bookstore (828 Broadway) in New York. Readers can buy a copy of The Southern Review or a $15 gift card at the Strand in order to attend this event.

Guest readers include poets Stephen Dunn, David Wojahn, and Chloe Honum. Stephen Dunn is the author of seventeen collections of poetry, including the recent Lines of Defense; he won the Pulitzer Prize in 2001 for Different Hours and has received numerous awards and honors for his work. He is Distinguished Professor (emeritus) of Creative Writing at Richard Stockton College of New Jersey and has also taught at Columbia University, NYU, University of Michigan, Princeton, and the University of Washington. David Wojahn is the author of eight collections of poetry, most recently Interrogation Palace: New and Selected Poems (2006), which was a named finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and winner of the O.B. Hardison Award from the Folger Shakespeare Library; and World Tree (2011), which received the Academy of American Poets’ Lenore Marshall Prize. He teaches at Virginia Commonwealth University and in the low-residency MFA in Writing Program of Vermont College of Fine Arts. Chloe Honum is the author of The Tulip-Flame, winner of the 2013 Cleveland State University Poetry Center First Book Prize. Her poems have appeared in The Southern Review, The Paris Review, and Poetry, among others.

Novelists Jayne Anne Phillips and Karl Taro Greenfield will also be at the Strand to read from their work. Phillips is the author of five novels, most recently Quiet Dell and two widely anthologized collections of stories. She is Distinguished Professor of English and Director of the MFA Program at Rutgers University. Karl Taro Greenfield is the author of eight books, including the new novel The Subprimes. His writing has appeared in The Atlantic, Harper’s, The Paris Review, Best American Short Stories, and O. Henry Prize stories, as well as in The Southern Review.

For more information about the event and the journal, please visit http://www.strandbooks.com/event/the-southern-review, or contact the LSU Press Marketing Department at 225.578.8282 / erolfs@lsu.edu.